Adept Rocketry - ES236 Instructions and Data Sheet

Dual Sequential Electronic Stager™

DESCRIPTION    Copyright © 1993-2003, All Rights Reserved

The ES236 Dual Sequential Electronic Stager™ is a two-event version of Adept's ES231 Electronic Stager™ (Electronic Mercury Switch™). The ES236 is used for controlling and timing the ignition of both the second stage and third stage in any three or more stage rocket. It may be used to control the ignition of the second stage in a two-stage rocket, or both the second stage and third stage in any three or more stage rocket. The Stager is used to ignite the second stage immediately after first-stage burnout, or an additional coast time delay may be added before second-stage ignition. Then if the second stage ignites and accelerates properly, the third stage will ignite after second-stage burnout. Also, as with the first-stage burnout, an additional coast time delay may be added before third-stage ignition (coast times are virtually unlimited—up to 10 minutes each).

The ES236 was inspired by Ron Dunn of Broken Arrow, Oklahoma in 1993. Ron was working on a three-stage rocket to be launched at LDRS-XII, and he was concerned about a particular failure scenario. "What if the second stage fails to ignite for some reason? A conventional dual-output timer would still ignite the third stage a little later, and possibly, the third stage would dive into the ground under full thrust!" The ES236 avoids this problem. If the second stage does not ignite and accelerate properly for at least 0.3 second, the third stage will not ignite.

The two-sequence ES236 Dual Sequential Stager™ is capable of supplying very high current to igniters or deployment charges. It arms at the first instant of liftoff, and each output fires individually in sequence. It may be used for staging multi-stage rockets, air starting motors, or for controlling parachute deployment at given times after individual motor burnouts. The Stager can also drive or furnish power to other types of electrical or electronic devices. It may be used for combinations of sequential ignition, staging, multi-event deployment (Dual Deployment™), etc.

The ES236 Stager is offered in two different configurations with different current supplying capabilities. The model designations are ES236LH and ES236H (ES236LH pictured above). The ES236H is identified by the absence of a couple of components, the large blue capacitor above the right end of the battery holder is missing, and the legend "EXTERNAL BATTERY REQUIRED" is visible. Also missing on the ES236H, the small 2-pin connector just below the red 6-pin connector. Both models are capable of supplying high current (up to 12 amps of current) when used with an external battery, to fire virtually any type of igniters or deployment charges, depending on the type of load driving battery used, alkaline, nicad, etc. The designation LH stands for low current or high current. When used for low current the ES236LH device does not need an external battery. The small on-board battery along with the large electrolytic capacitor are used to fire flashbulbs or low-current electric matches such as the Davey Fire brand 28B or 28BR electric match. When used for high current, the LH device requires use of an external battery. The ES236H device (lowest cost) always requires use of an external battery even to fire only low-current igniters or deployment charges.

A 12-volt lighter battery is used to keep the microprocessor system running glitch free during the times of heavy current demand on external load-driving batteries. Current to a low-current load is actually supplied by the large electrolytic capacitor on the ES236LH. The lighter battery is always used, even when an external battery is required. Times are programmable to values in excess of 10 minutes in increments as fine as 1/100 second. The length of time in which the outputs remain energized is also programmable. Programmed settings are nonvolatile, and they are not affected when the device is turned off or when the batteries are removed. The settings remain indefinitely until they are reprogrammed.

The outputs may be used to drive light bulbs, or electric motors for functions of a mechanical nature. They can also be used to furnish power to other electric or electronic devices, with fully programmable on-times and off-times. Programming and testing is simple and quick. The ES236 uses Adept’s patented acceleration sensing system ("A" Switch™) for simplicity and to insure safety. If acceleration and movement upward does not continue for at least 0.3 second, the timeout operations will not be enabled. The system cannot be set off accidentally by dropping, shaking, bumping, falling over, etc. Operation starts at the first moment of liftoff.

This microprocessor based device measures 1.4" wide by 0.65" thick by 3" long. It fits in a tube with a minimum ID of 1.5 inches (38 mm). It will also fit on either side of a center plate inside a 54 mm ID bay, three inches long. Its weight with battery installed is only 1.2 ounces. An Adept CAB6L-xx series Interconnect Cable Assembly (or CAB6BC) is used to control power, and for igniter (or deployment charge) connection. Included is circuitry to detect and separately indicate when the igniters have continuity. The battery life for this product is many hours, so you need not be concerned about how long your rocket sits on the launch pad after being connected to igniters and powered up.

SPECIFICATIONS

  • Totally Stand-Alone Device including Battery Holder, Liftoff Detection System, and Continuity Sensing of the connected loads.
  • Maximum Time Settings: 650 Seconds stored in Nonvolatile EEPROM Memory. Memory Size sufficient to record 100 Time Increments Per Second for 650 Seconds (>10 minutes).
  • Minimum Acceleration Time required to detect liftoff is 0.3 Second. Times start at the First Moment of Deceleration after valid Acceleration Times of 0.3 Second.
  • Piezo Beeper for indicating Operational Status, Continuity of the Igniters or Deployment Charges, and as an Aid for Programming and Testing. The programming method is simple and quick and precise. The Piezo Beeper beeps once a second (single beep) to indicate normal operation with no loads connected. Double beep indicates continuity of the first igniter only. Triple beep indicates continuity of the second igniter only. Four beeps repeating indicates that both igniters or deployment charges have continuity.
  • Lighter Battery powers the microprocessor system with a battery life in excess of 10 hours.
  • Current Driving Capability: in Low Current Mode a large integral capacitor is used to furnish a current pulse sufficient to fire flashbulbs or low-current electric matches such as the Davey Fire brand 28B or 28BR types. No external battery is required. The H version always requires use of an external battery. With the proper battery it can fire any Igniter or Deployment Charge presently available. The LH version can fire flashbulbs or low-current charges without an external battery, or high-current charges with the proper external battery. Either version can supply up to 12 Amps of Current for several seconds when used with an N-6PT 9-volt size nicad battery. The voltage of the External Battery should be in the range of 3 to 12 volts.
  • Measures 1.4" wide x 0.65" thick x 2.75" long. Fits in 1.496" (38 mm) ID tube. Weighs only 1.2 ounces (LH heaviest version) with the lighter battery installed.
  • Accessories required: one 12-volt alkaline lighter battery, one interconnect cable (Adept CAB6L-xx Series) for connecting an On-Off switch and for connecting the igniters or deployment charges, and an appropriate external battery (if used) with battery holder or battery clip. When the device is shipped from the factory, a modified CAB6L-12 cable and a high quality battery clip (Adept CAB6BC Cable / Battery Clip Assembly Kit) for a 9-volt size external battery are included.
TESTING AND USING THE ES236

NOTE 1: The circuitry on the ES236 may be sensitive to noise and static when being held. Always handle this device by the edges when testing or installing to avoid touching any of the circuitry during normal operation. Avoid carpeted floors and other sources of static electricity when handling and testing the device. Never store the device in a clear plastic bag; however, pink-colored or smoke-colored antistatic bags are ideal. Storage in a small cardboard box, or wrapped in a paper towel inside a plastic bag is acceptable. Do not use Velcro to secure the device. Use care to keep the device clean and dry.

NOTE 2: The device must be installed only in a “clean area.” Electronic instrumentation is not compatible with the fumes and residue created by rocket motors and deployment charges. The Stager must be installed in an area that is totally sealed from rocket motors and charges. After passing wires through holes in bulkheads and such, seal them with epoxy or removable putty.

The procedures below may be followed as a tutorial.

Install a 12-volt alkaline lighter battery (GP-23A, Eveready Energizer No. A23, Radio Shack 23-144, etc.) in the battery holder. The spring end of the battery holder connects to the negative end of the battery. Remove the battery when not in use to avoid prolonged stress on the battery holder and possible long-term disfigurement of the battery holder.

Connect a CAB6L-xx Series cable or special CAB6L-12 cable (Adept CAB6BC Cable / Battery Clip Assembly Kit, included) to the 6-pin connector on the upper end of the device. The CAB6BC supplied with the ES236 is actually a kit that may be configured in several ways. If using an ES236LH in Low Current Mode you may use a CAB6L-12, CAB6L-24, or CAB6L-36 cable. The CAB6BC cable becomes a CAB6L-12 cable when you install the 12" RED wire (between the BROWN and ORANGE wires) and the 12" BLACK wire on the other side of the BROWN wire. When using the ES236LH in Low Current Mode assure that a jumper is installed on the 2-pin connector just below the red 6-pin connector.

When using the ES236H, or when using the ES236LH in High Current Mode, assemble the CAB6BC with the two special "doubled-up" RED and BLACK wires that include a Battery Clip for a 9-volt size external battery. The extra RED (positive +) and BLACK (negative -) wires plug on to the external 9-volt size battery. If you wish to use a different type of external battery, then cut the wires close to the battery clip and use the short RED and BLACK wires to connect to the external battery (3 to 12 volts). When using the ES236LH with an external battery in High Current Mode assure that the jumper is REMOVED FROM the 2-pin connector just below the red 6-pin connector.

Powering Up the Stager

The device will power up when the ends of the BLACK wire and the BROWN wire are connected together. An On-Off switch may be used. When the device is powered up, it beeps every second to indicate normal operation and that it is now waiting for rocket liftoff. This is also the mode used for testing the device with or without a load connected. NOTE: when the ES236LH is turned off, it will continue to run for an additional 15 seconds or so until the large capacitor is discharged.

Testing the Stager

The ES236 is preprogrammed in the factory as follows. Output # 1 will turn on 1 second after the Acceleration Switch closes for at least 0.3 second and is then reopened, and it will remain on for 1 second. Output # 2 will turn on 4 seconds after the Acceleration Switch closes for at least 0.3 second the second time and is released again, and it will remain on for 2 seconds. To test the settings with no loads connected, power up the device, and then close the Acceleration Switch for at least 0.3 second to simulate a valid liftoff. After the Switch is released, then after an additional 1 second (the Output # 1 coast time setting) there will be a beep, to indicate that Output # 1 turns on 1 second after first-stage burnout. Then after another 1 second there will be a boop (lower tone beep) to indicate that Output # 1 has turned off.

Close the Switch again for at least 0.3 second. After the switch is released again and after an additional 4 seconds (the Output # 2 coast time setting) there will be another beep to indicate that Output # 2 turns on 4 seconds after second-stage burnout. Two seconds later, the boop indicates that Output # 2 has turned off. Then after a pause, the ES236 returns to normal operation.

NOTE: the device is triggered each time when the Acceleration Switch remains closed for at least 0.3 second. It is virtually impossible for the device to fire due to dropping, shaking, or bouncing. Try it some time. However, when mounted in a rocket with the cable connectors toward the nose of the rocket, and the Acceleration Switch toward the aft end of the rocket, the device will start when the rocket launches. The first stage and second stage rocket motors must have minimum thrust times of 0.3 second, and the rocket must accelerate with sufficient G force for a minimum of 0.3 second each time. This requirement is met by virtually all commercially available rocket motors that are used as recommended in rockets that have a maximum recommended weight. WARNING: don’t use this device in an experimental vehicle designed to operate with a slow takeoff and/or slow second-stage acceleration. Don’t use motors that have extremely short burn times.

SAFETY SAFETY SAFETY

Never install the ES236 Stager in a rocket without first testing both of its controlling outputs. Always test before each flight with flashbulbs or low-current electric matches similar to the ones that will be used in the actual flight. Connect and enable igniters only during testing, and as one of the last steps before launching. When installing, especially in large vehicles, for maximum safety, it is important to use additional safety gimmicks such as quick disconnects, and igniter shorting clips. With the rocket on the launch pad, only then enable the igniters or deployment charges and turn on the power. Then as the last step remove any igniter shorting gimmicks.

PROGRAMMING THE ES236

Please read through the following information before attempting to program the ES236.

To program (permanently change) the time settings, either Output # 1 or Output # 2 must be selected, and the ES236 must be put into Programming Mode. Output # 1 is selected by shorting together the two Output # 1 connections. Output # 2 is selected by shorting together its output connections. Note: Programming should be done in Low Current Mode (no external battery) when programming the ES236LH. The ES236H must be programmed with the external battery connected. Be sure to remove the short circuit connection across Output # 1 or Output # 2 before testing the ES236 with an External Battery. If neither output is shorted, or if both outputs are shorted, programming is disabled.

To put the ES236 into Programming Mode, it must be powered up while the Acceleration Switch is held closed. Programming is then done via the Acceleration Switch. It will be used as if it is a push button switch. The Switch state is normally open with the brass bar up against the battery holder. Push the brass bar toward the microswitch to close it, or close it via its chrome lever. But be careful not to damage the assembly.

A better way to close the switch is to use your right thumb to push up the short end of the brass bar. Place the device on a flat insulated surface with the cable connector away from you and the switch toward you. Hold it in place with your left forefinger on the battery. With your right thumb push the short end of the brass bar upward. This movement can be quick and precise. Practice this a few times.

Programming is done by closing (and quickly releasing) the Acceleration Switch once to start the time setting, and again at the end of the desired time. At the end of the desired time, the switch is closed again but not quickly released. The amount of time it is held closed the second time determines how long the output stays turned on. See: Special Programming Considerations below.

When the Stager is powered up in programming mode, there will be a beep, followed by a long beep. Then the Stager will start buzzing to indicate programming mode. You can use the second hand of a watch or clock to indicate times, or you can simply count seconds if real accurate settings are not important.

Programming the device takes a little practice at first. But after a few tries, it will be very quick and precise. Turn off the Stager if not already off and wait for the beeping to stop. Close the Acceleration Switch, and turn on the ES236 while the switch remains closed. Release the switch as soon as you hear a beep. After the long beep the device will start buzzing. It will take two closures of the Switch to program the time setting, once at the beginning and again at the end. Watch the second hand of the clock for start and stop times.

Press and release the Switch to start the time. There will be a beep, and the buzzing will continue. At the desired time, press the Switch again (another beep), but do not release until the desired amount of active-on time is complete (another beep). The Stager will change back to normal mode, beeping once a second.

If neither output is shorted (selected), or if both outputs are shorted (selected), programming is disabled, but the buzzing and beeps still work the same. You may practice programming without actually changing previous programming by selecting neither output (or both).

The ES236 is a Stager, and a Stager must be capable of being programmed with coast times with the value zero. You may wish to fire the next stage immediately on burnout of the previous stage. To handle this requirement with the ES236, do the following. When programming coast times, always add 2 seconds to the time required for the coast time. If you want a coast time of 1 second, then program for 3 seconds. If you want a coast time of 4 seconds, then program for 6 seconds. If you want a coast time of zero, then program for 2 seconds or less. Any time programmed for 2 seconds or less fixes the coast time to zero.

To set the Output # 1 coast time to 1 second after first-stage burnout, and to stay on for 1 second:

Turn off the ES236 and wait for it to stop running. Connect the RED wire to the ORANGE wire. This shorts the connections for Output # 1, and selects it for programming. Close the Acceleration Switch, and turn on the ES236 while the switch remains closed. Release the switch as soon as you hear the first beep. While the device is buzzing (and while watching the second hand on a clock), at an appropriate start time, close and immediately release the Switch (beep). Then when the second hand reaches 3 seconds later, close and hold for 1 second this time, then release again (buzzing stops). The coast time setting for Output # 1 is now 1 second with a 1 second on time, and will remain this way forever until you change it again. Now disconnect the RED and ORANGE wires.

To set the Output # 2 coast time to 4 seconds after second-stage burnout, and to stay on for 2 seconds:

Turn off the ES236 and wait for it to stop running. Connect the YELLOW wire to the GREEN wire. This shorts the connections for Output # 2, and selects it for programming. Close the Acceleration Switch, and turn on the ES236 while the switch remains closed. While the device is buzzing (and while watching the second hand on a clock), at an appropriate start time, close and immediately release the Switch (beep). Then when the second hand reaches 6 seconds later, close and hold for 2 seconds this time, then release again (buzzing stops). The coast time setting for Output # 2 is now 4 seconds with a 2 second on time, and will remain this way forever until you change it again. Now disconnect the YELLOW and GREEN wires.

With the Stager beeping normally with no loads connected, test the settings. Close the Acceleration Switch for at least 0.3 second to simulate a valid liftoff. After the Switch is released, then after an additional 1 second (the Output # 1 coast time setting) there will be a beep, to indicate that Output # 1 turns on 1 second after first-stage burnout. After another 1 second there will be a boop to indicate that Output # 1 has turned off.

Close the Switch again for at least 0.3 second. After the switch is released again and after an additional 4 seconds (the Output # 2 coast time setting) there will be another beep to indicate that Output # 2 turns on 4 seconds after second-stage burnout. Two seconds later, the boop indicates that Output # 2 has turned off. Then after a pause, the ES236 returns to normal operation.

Special Programming Considerations

When programming outputs, do not allow either output (especially the first to fire) to remain on longer than necessary. A one-second drive time is more than sufficient to fire virtually any igniter or deployment charge. Some igniters do not burn up totally when fired (the wire does not open up), and they may continue to draw excessive current.

When using the ES236LH in Low Current Mode (no external battery) to fire flashbulb or low current electric match charges, the On Times should be only a small fraction of a second. They fire very quickly. So to program the ES236LH in Low Current mode do the following. While the device is buzzing (and while watching the second hand on a clock), at an appropriate start time, close and immediately release the Switch (beep). Then when the second hand reaches 2 seconds later (or whatever you wish to set the time to), close and immediately release again. The On Time will be about 1/20 second or so.

When using the Stager in High Current Mode to supply power to other devices, or to run electric motors, each On Time may be any value up to 10 minutes. The amount of current drawn during this period must be low enough (one amp or so) so that the on-board drivers do not over heat.

TEST THE ES236 WITH REAL LOADS

The outputs may be tested with light bulbs, flashbulbs, electric matches, Estes igniters, etc. Light bulbs are the least expensive alternative for general purpose testing. But never assume that a particular type of igniter or charge or other device will work with your battery without first trying them. Warning: never install this device in a rocket without first testing its controlling outputs. Always test before each flight. Also, backup systems and/or instrument redundancy (use of two similar systems in the same rocket) are recommended.

When turned on, the Stager beeps once a second to indicate normal operation with no loads connected. When an igniter or deployment charge is connected to Output # 1 only, RED and ORANGE wires, the single beeps of once a second, change into double beeps to indicate continuity of the igniter or deployment charge on Output # 1 only. When Output # 2 only is connected, YELLOW and GREEN wires, triple beeps indicate continuity of Output # 2 only. When both outputs have loads connected, the beeping pattern is 4 beeps.

If you wish to use a light bulb for low cost general testing in Low Current Mode, then use a low-current 6 to 12 volt bulb in place of a low-current igniter or flashbulb. It probably will just flash. In High Current Mode, in place of a high-current igniter, use a bulb with a voltage rating similar to the voltage of the external battery being used. It should stay turned on for the full on-time setting for the output. But always test at least once or twice with the same type of igniter that will be used in an actual flight. The proper way to test if a device can always fire an igniter or deployment charge is to try it with two in parallel. If it can usually fire two, then it should always be able to fire just one. The proper way to test if a device can fire two igniters or deployment charges in parallel is to try it with three in parallel. If it can usually fire three, then it should always be able to fire just two.

MOUNTING AND INSTALLING

This device must be installed lengthwise in a rocket tube with the acceleration switch toward the bottom. A couple of thoughts on mounting and installing this device used successfully so far are included here. The ES236 fits inside a 38 mm ID tube. Bulkheads, blocks, a fixed nosecone, etc. can be used to secure the Stager. The ES236 also may be mounted on either side of a center plate inside a 54 mm ID tube. When it is to be used in larger diameter body tubes, it may be mounted on basswood, plywood pieces, etc. that connect to bulkheads or a modified nosecone. Or it may be installed inside a 38 mm tube that is mounted to a plate. Whenever possible, support the lower end by mounting it against a bulkhead. The mounting holes are .090 inch diameter for #2 hardware. Use #2 screws, standoffs, and hexnuts when mounting to wood or other material. Do not enlarge the mounting holes, and do not use Velcro.

The device may be placed inside a 38 mm tube (that has a bulkhead at one end and a removable cap at the other) and secured in the parachute area of a larger tube. The parachute (and wadding if any) would fit in the remaining area beside the mounting tube. Care must be taken to assure that the parachute (and wadding) will still deploy properly. In some larger rockets, rocketeers have devised clever doors or hatches on the outside of the airframe that allow access to the Stager which is mounted between the airframe and the motor mount. The Stager may be mounted in the second or third stage of a rocket.

Note: the higher the weight is in the vehicle (CG closer to nose end) the more it adds to overall rocket stability. Mount the ES236 in the third stage for best stability. This allows direct connection to the third-stage igniter, but a "slip disconnect" is necessary in the wires that run down to the second-stage igniter. The wires slip loose when the stages separate. If the device is mounted in the second stage, then a "slip disconnect" is necessary in the wires that run up to the third-stage igniter. Adept CAB2-xx and CAB2-xxD cables may be used. The Stager must be installed in an area that is totally sealed from rocket motors and charges. After passing wires through holes in bulkheads and such, seal them with epoxy or removable putty.

LIMITED WARRANTY AND DISCLAIMER

Adept Rocketry and Adept Instruments, Inc. warrant to the original purchaser that this product is free of defective parts and workmanship and that it will remain in good working order for a period of 90 days from the date of original purchase. This product will be repaired or replaced within 90 days of purchase if it fails to operate as specified, if returned by the original purchaser and if it has not been damaged or modified, or serviced by anyone other than the manufacturer. Adept Rocketry and Adept Instruments, Inc., their owners, employees, vendors and contractors shall not be liable for any special, incidental, or consequential damages or for loss, damage or expense directly or indirectly arising from customer’s or anyone’s use of or inability to use this device either separately or in combination with other equipment, or for personal injury or loss or destruction of other property, for experiment failure, or for any other cause. This device is sold as an experimental accessory only, and due to the nature of experimental carriers such as rockets, the possibility of failure can never be totally removed. It is up to the user, the experimenter, to use good judgement and safe design practices and to properly pretest the device for its intended performance in the intended vehicle, or reasonable facsimile of same, under controlled conditions to gain reasonable belief that the device and vehicle will perform in a safe manner, and to assure that all reasonable precautions are exercised to prevent injury or damage to anyone or anything. WARNING: Do not use this device unless you completely understand, agree with, and accept all of the above statements and conditions.

ES236LH Dual Sequential Stager™
Price: $81.00 - Includes CAB6BC Cable/Battery Clip Assembly Kit and GP-23A battery.
Supplies Low Current or High Current. Requires External Battery only for High Current.

ES236H Dual Sequential Stager™
Price: $76.00 - Includes CAB6BC Cable/Battery Clip Assembly Kit and GP-23A battery.
Supplies Low Current or High Current. Always Requires Use of External Battery.

ADDITIONAL ACCESSORIES

Additional CAB6BC Cable/Battery Clip Assembly Kit
Price: $7.50 - Connects the ES236 to an On-Off Switch, an External Battery if used, and to Igniters or Deployment Charges.

CAB6L-24 Interconnect Cable
Price: $7.50 - 24 inches long. Connects the ES236 to an On-Off Switch, an External Battery if used, and to Igniters or Deployment Charges.
CAB6L-12 Interconnect Cable
Price: $5.99 - 12 inches long.
CAB6L-36 Interconnect Cable
Price: $8.79 - 36 inches long.

CAB2-12D - 12-inch CAB2-12 Interconnect Cable with 12-inch Disconnect Leads
Price: $3.39 - 24 inches long total. Used as Disconnect between rocket stages or sections.
CAB2-24D - 24-inch CAB2-24 Interconnect Cable with 24-inch Disconnect Leads
Price: $4.25 - 48 inches long total.
CAB2-36D - 36-inch CAB2-36 Interconnect Cable with 36-inch Disconnect Leads
Price: $4.99 - 72 inches long total.

Additional GP-23A Alkaline Lighter Battery - Price: $2.25

GP-23A50 Alkaline Lighter Batteries (box of 50 at 50% Discount) - Price: $56.25

The GE/Sanyo 9 volt size nicad batteries are made with cylindrical cells and have very low internal resistance. They can supply up to 15 Amps of current for short periods, making them ideal for many rocketry uses.

N-6PT GE/Sanyo 9 Volt Size Rechargeable Nicad Battery - Price: $16.79 out of stock

WY-29V Charger for Two 9 Volt Size Nicad Batteries (plugs into wall socket) - Price: $14.50

Shorting Jumpers are used on some devices to program certain values or functions. One Jumper is used on the ES236LH when it is used without an External Battery in Low Current Mode.

Shorting Jumpers - Price: $1.39 per pack of 10.

Electronic Instrumentation is not compatible with the fumes and residue created by rocket motors and deployment charges. Seal holes and gaps in bulkheads and such with epoxy or removable putty.

Tac'N Stik Removable and Reusable Putty - Price: $1.99 per 2 ounce pack.

The ES236 is also available in another form as the ST236 Dual (Two-Event) Timer. Unlike a Dual Sequential Stager™ which fires the second stage when it detects deceleration of the first stage due to motor burnout, and then in sequence, fires the third stage when it detects deceleration of the second stage, a Dual Timer has two outputs that both fire based on given times after initial liftoff. The ST236 may be used for combinations of sequential ignition, staging, air starting motors, multi-event deployment (Dual Deployment™), etc.

ST236LH Dual (Two-Event) Staging / Deployment Timer
Price: $81.00 - Includes CAB6BC Cable/Battery Clip Assembly Kit and GP-23A battery.
Supplies Low Current or High Current. Requires External Battery only for High Current.

ST236H Dual (Two-Event) Staging / Deployment Timer
Price: $76.00 - Includes CAB6BC Cable/Battery Clip Assembly Kit and GP-23A battery.
Supplies Low Current or High Current. Always Requires Use of an External Battery.

www.adeptrocketry.com, 4-2-03